The First Bionic Guy! Elon Musk Shares A Video Of A Patient With A Neuralink Brain Device Who Uses “Telepathy“ To Play Computer Chess Just By Thinking

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The Tesla chief… Elon Musk, shared a stunning video showing the first person use a Neuralink brain chip to move a computer cursor and play video games with just thinking.

In a video posted on X, the 29-year-old paraplegic patient Noland Arbaugh, demonstrated how to play chess with just his mind.

See that cursor on the screen? That’s all me… it’s all brainpower he stated from his wheelchair. In the video, Arbaugh revealed that eight years prior, he had a freak diving accident that left him paralyzed from the shoulders down.

 Elon Musk
X / @neuralink

Experts believe that the successful use of the technology by the man from Arizona could transform the way that people with disabilities are cared for.

Arbaugh grinned broadly the entire time the engineer was filming him demonstrating how the mouse moved side to side across the virtual chess board.

This seems to be how Earth’s technology actually worked, with Arbaugh likening moving the mouse around the screen to using ‘The Force’ from Star Wars.

I’m so freaking lucky to be a part of this, everyday it feels like we’re learning new stuff, he remarked.

Tech entrepreneur announced a month ago that the first person had the chip implanted, and he claimed at the time that he was “able to move a mouse around the screen just by thinking.”

Progress is good and the patient seems to have made a full recovery, with neural effects that we are aware of, Elon said in a Spaces event on X.

Tech billionaire reposted the video of Arbaugh using ”telepathy” on Wednesday, along with the caption, “Livestream of Neuralink demonstrating ‘Telepathy’ – controlling a computer and playing video games just by thinking.”

Neuralink’s technology involves using a robot to perform surgery to implant a brain-computer interface in the part of the brain responsible for intention to move.

The technology comprises of a “sewing machine-like” robot implanting small flexible threads, connected to a computer chip, into the brain.

During the procedure, the sewing robot removes a tiny piece of the skull, attaches the thread-like electrodes to specific parts of the brain, stitches up the hole, and leaves only the tiny incision as a visible scar.

Musk stated that patients can go back home the same day after the fitting process, which just takes 30 minutes and doesn’t require general anesthesia.

Elon Musk
GETTY

Before his catastrophic accident, Arbaugh was a Corps of Cadets at Texas A&M. He added that the procedure was “super easy” and that there was “nothing to be afraid of.”

The 29-year-old said he has lived for years with “absolutely no feeling” from below his shoulders after suffering his crippling injury in 2016 while working at a children’s camp in Texas.

Noland saying that before his injury, he used to love playing chess, continuing, This is one of the things that y’all have enabled me to do… I wasn’t really able to do much the last few years.

Elon Musk
X / @neuralink

Noland gives Neuralink a hearty recommendation, noting that while much work remains to be done to make it flawless, the company’s current state of development is encouraging. He is pleased to be patient number one and claims that the sheer number of people this might potentially help is staggering.

The graphics are quite striking, and given how well it’s working so far, you have to think that more people will put their names down to be test subjects for this project.

Hello to the future!

About Post Author

Danny Freeman

Danny Freeman is a correspondent for usnewsdaily , based in Philadelphia. The Emmy Award-winning reporter joined usnewsdaily in 2023 from NBC10 in Philadelphia.While at NBC10, Freeman worked as an Investigative Reporter focused on campaign finance, environmental issues, and police accountability.Freeman returned to the East Coast after working as a political reporter for NBC 7 in San Diego, where he hosted “Politically Speaking,” the station’s weekly public affairs show. Prior to that, he was a reporter at KGET-17 News, the NBC affiliate in Bakersfield, California.
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