Over 50 million people are at risk of severe weather from Texas to Virginia, with the possibility of tornadoes and strong winds

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A wide-ranging storm system is currently sweeping across the United States, posing threats of severe weather conditions including heavy rain, snow, and gusty winds. This system spans from Texas to Virginia and has the potential to impact over 50 million people in states such as Texas, Oklahoma, and Missouri.

Here’s a breakdown of how the threats will unfold in the coming days.

On Monday, there’s an enhanced risk of severe weather spanning from northeastern Texas to western Indiana. Let’s break down the details.

The main region of interest for Monday is from western Indiana to northeastern Texas, where the Storm Prediction Center has issued a level 3 of 5 elevated risk for severe storms.

Among the cities in the elevated risk zone are Dallas, Fort Worth, Oklahoma City, Springfield, and St. Louis. Here, tornadoes, big to very-large hail (diameters greater than two inches), and damaging wind gusts pose the greatest hazards.

The prediction center issues a warning, saying, “The severe threat will peak afternoon/evening in the southern Plains with the greatest threat for the Ohio Valley vicinity being the evening/overnight period.”

From central Texas to western West Virginia, including the cities of San Antonio, Indianapolis, Austin, Kansas City, and Cincinnati, there is a small danger of severe storms, or a level 2 of 5.

From Texas to eastern Virginia, a level 1 of 5 marginal danger of severe storms extends to cities such as Amarillo, Shreveport, Richmond, and Columbus, Ohio. Large hail and strong wind gusts provide the greatest risks, but a tornado is still a possibility.

According to research, tornadoes that occur at night are more than twice as deadly as those that occur during the day. Tornadoes are difficult to spot in the dark and are more deadly because people are sleeping.

Over 8 million people are under a flood watch, which will be in place from eastern Indiana to western Maryland starting on Monday and lasting through late Tuesday. One to four inches of rain might fall, with isolated areas perhaps receiving up to five inches.

On Monday, there may be further snowfall in some areas of the Northern Plains and a wintry mix in the Upper Midwest.

Over 50 million people
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Tuesday: Severe storm system moves east:

The risk of severe thunderstorms extends from northern Alabama to southern Ohio, including Nashville, Louisville and Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky.

Large hail, destructive wind gusts, and tornadoes provide the worst threats; these hazards are comparable to those in the areas that are slightly at risk of severe storms, which includes Cincinnati, Birmingham, Knoxville, and Chattanooga and stretches from central Mississippi to central Ohio.

On Tuesday, Memphis, Tennessee, Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, Washington, DC, and Baltimore are among the cities that are rated as level 1 of 5.

Large hail, destructive wind gusts, and tornadoes provide the worst threats; these hazards are comparable to those in the areas that are slightly at risk of severe storms, which includes Cincinnati, Birmingham, Knoxville, and Chattanooga and stretches from central Mississippi to central Ohio.

Memphis, Tennessee, Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, Washington, DC, and Baltimore are among the cities listed as being in level 1 of 5 threat for Tuesday.

Temperatures are low enough across the storm’s northern flank to suggest the likelihood of a wintry mix and possibly some April snowfall. A wintry mix may be seen in some areas of the Northern Plains and the Upper Midwest on Monday, but the threat of winter weather will move to the Great Lakes and interior Northeast as early as Tuesday and stay there through Thursday.

There may even be a few flakes in cities like Chicago, but minimal snowfall accumulation is anticipated. Higher altitudes in the interior Northeast, including the Green, White, and Adirondack Mountains, as well as portions of northern Michigan are predicted to receive the most snowfall totals.

It is now predicted that the major cities in the Northeast will only get precipitation.

About Post Author

Danny Freeman

Danny Freeman is a correspondent for usnewsdaily , based in Philadelphia. The Emmy Award-winning reporter joined usnewsdaily in 2023 from NBC10 in Philadelphia.While at NBC10, Freeman worked as an Investigative Reporter focused on campaign finance, environmental issues, and police accountability.Freeman returned to the East Coast after working as a political reporter for NBC 7 in San Diego, where he hosted “Politically Speaking,” the station’s weekly public affairs show. Prior to that, he was a reporter at KGET-17 News, the NBC affiliate in Bakersfield, California.
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